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One of the stores in our area has a VI tenor 123xxx that's a relacquer with a replacement neck. The thing came from the Air Force band and is a super good player. Really sweet. Thinking about buying it but a couple of things give me pause. They don't know who did the relacquer job and it looks like it was heavily buffed. Most of the engraving on the bell is gone. Hard to know what effect, if any, that has on the way it plays. Like I said, I played it and was very impressed with it. It really sings! The action is very nice and it's in excellent mechanical condition (new pads, professional setup, etc.) If I did buy it I wouldn't be that concerned with resale value as I would be buying it to play and not to sell. So, what do you guys think? Is that price a little steep? If you played it and fell in love with it would you let the relacquer issue stop you from pulling the trigger on it?
 

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Is it a VI replacement neck?

IMO $4900 isn't way over the top. It's also depends on the pad condition and general setup, so if it's all perfect this sounds like a great deal to me.

As for the relacquer, I myself prefer to buy unoriginal horns, as they are usually less expensive. Also, because of it not being a museum piece,I don't have to worry about taking it out of the house and actually play it.

Relacquer, no original neck, solder work, patches and these things really don't mean anything beside a lower price and appearance, if you can go out there and play it!!
You can't know and shouldn't care, whether it played even better in original condition, you are there now and it PLAYS!!

Bottom line:
Go for it and have fun.
 

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Seems too high. For that kind of money you could buy and sell a few on E-bay until you find something you like for under $4,000.
 

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Seems too high. For that kind of money you could buy and sell a few on E-bay until you find something you like for under $4,000.
And every time you spend another $200 - $300 to get the pads to seal, just to find out it's a dud!?!

And what about the time and head space that doing this would occupy?
 

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I agree, that it seems high, especially as you describe it, heavy buffing and a replacement neck. I think that, for that money, you can find one that's original and plays as well. Unfortunately, and probably unjustifiedly, the horn will always have the stigma associated with the relaquer work and new neck. From an investment standpoint, it's a non-starter, if the invesment is important to you. Good Luck.
 

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There are a lot of great horns out there for that kind of money - many of the don't say "Selmer".

It you love it, it rings your bell, and your pocket can cover it, why are you asking a bunch o' folk that haven't played it?

I know several people that have payed a lot more for a not-so-great playing horn...
 

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There are a lot of great horns out there for that kind of money - many of the don't say "Selmer".

It you love it, it rings your bell, and your pocket can cover it, why are you asking a bunch o' folk that haven't played it?

I know several people that have payed a lot more for a not-so-great playing horn...
This is very true. There are lots of horns out there today for much less money that play very well. Try a few before you part with the cash. I love my Selmers, but "yas gotta keep an open mind".
 

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And every time you spend another $200 - $300 to get the pads to seal, just to find out it's a dud!?!

And what about the time and head space that doing this would occupy?
I guess I would have to put this in prospective. When I was a kid, I watched the newspaper classified section week after week for a Mark VI for sale. Back in the day, it took months and months before something came on the market. (At least where I lived). So buying a selling a few horns looking for something I like - doesn't seem like a big deal. In fact, I puchased my current alto this way. Got a great price and it's a killer horn. Even USAHorn has original lacquer VI altos for less money.
 

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This is very true. There are lots of horns out there today for much less money that play very well.
I'd rather have peace of mind over my setup, than a stressful life of hunting for the the best bargain horn and money on my account, which will either be spent buying more gear or eventually loose it's value anyway.

A VI is a VI let's not forget that. And the best cure for GAS is prophylaxis.
 

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A VI is a VI let's not forget that.
That's what sellers and dealers would like you to believe.

Have another cup of KoolAid.
 

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That's what sellers and dealers would like you to believe.

Have another cup of KoolAid.
Yes I was at points selmerized by Saint Henry VI.

At least his business is to preach rather than to tweak the sound system in his church.
 

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have you tried offering less....like $4000? they know that a relacquered heavily buffed horn with faint engraving isn't going to bring as much as an all original one will or they'd have it on ebay probably. VI's are fine horns but IMO they are over priced & the really great ones aren't usually for sale unless someone dies or their kid needs a kidney transplant. shop around, ck closed auctions on ebay to see what a decent VI is going for with 50 to 60% lacquer. ck some big city newspaper classifieds/musical instruments. music stores will price a VI thru the roof........unless you just don't care & have the VI bug. it's a bad virus, hard to cure.
 

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Yes I was at points selmerized by Saint Henry VI.

At least his business is to preach rather than to tweak the sound system in his church.
I played Selmers for 25+ years - but I was never a Selmer sycophant nor disciple. I play what works best for me regardless of its label.

I don't understand your dig at "tweaking the sound system in his church".
 

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...is a super good player. Really sweet.

Like I said, I played it and was very impressed with it. It really sings! The action is very nice and it's in excellent mechanical condition (new pads, professional setup, etc.) If I did buy it I wouldn't be that concerned with resale value as I would be buying it to play and not to sell.
Those statements are the bottom line. Given what you say here, I'd definitely buy that horn. Who cares if it's a relac if it plays and you aren't planning on re-selling it?

Just for the heck of it, why not try to talk them down on the price, as AG suggests? What I'd do is decide to buy it, but go in there and really push for a lower price. Tell them you can see it's a relac, and how about a break on the price. Maybe, just maybe, they'll reduce it enough that you can go buy a new mpc (if you need one). If they are adamant and won't budge, then buy it anyway.
 

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I don't understand your dig at "tweaking the sound system in his church".
All I want to say is that the man found a horn he likes and apparently has the money to buy it. So I think he should buy it.

GAS: the feeling that there is something "better" out there. This would also include a better price-performance ratio.

The problem with GAS is, that it never really stops just ask people who change mouthpieces every month or so. It just distracts you from playing, that is for me at least.
So I don't want to give him more GAS, since it was the reason he started this thread in the first place.
 

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All I want to say is that the man found a horn he likes and apparently has the money to buy it. So I think he should buy it.
I agree.

Thanks for the response.
 

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Hi, Jeff. I love the way the 120K VI tenors play. The sound tends to be big, bold, and solid without being harsh.

The price on VI tenors is finally starting to come down a bit because of the economy. A 120K tenor with original lacquer and neck is now somewhere in the $7K to $8K range on eBay. A good relac in top condition might bring $5K on a good day. However, with heavy buffing and a replacement neck, you're looking at a $4K horn that would be a hard resell, no matter how well it plays.

The only problem with overpaying for a horn is, if you ever need to sell it (which could happen due to economic emergency or you find a better VI), that money is just gone. So, does it play so well that you're willing to pay $1K just for the priviledge of playing it for however long you have it? Another consideration, if the economy keeps getting worse, prices could continue to drop to where it might be a $3K horn. I do agree, the prices on Selmer tenors have been artificially high. I personally wouldn't want to gamble on them staying there forever.

FWIW, I have found the 120-130K range of VI tenors to be the most consistent of all VI's. They have all played pretty much alike for me and I never found one I didn't like, which I can't say for any other vintage. If I could pair the 120K sound with the lighter action of a 5 digit, it would be my dream horn.

I would offer them less to see if they'll negotiate.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks, guys. Still mulling it over. Maybe someone else will buy it and put me out of my misery. It's not like I actually need the horn. My Yamaha 62 gets the job done just fine. There's just something about that Mark VI tone that keeps nagging at me.
 
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