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Over the years, being one that approaches every guest artist for lessons, I've been able to take some lessons with some great players over the years. I created a pdf with three low note exercises that I compiled based on their effectiveness as developing evenness, creating warmth and teaching control. They are from Ray Smith, Lew Tabackin and Paul Nedzela. The full article and pdf is here and a summary down below. Video here.

Ray Smith - Beginning at low G, start with a clean ‘du’ articulation and firm air support, moving the jaw forward slightly as you descend. Play with full tone and even dynamics. First with minor thirds, then major thirds all the way to major sixth ie G E Gb Eb F D etc.

Lew Tabackin - Begin with a ‘ha’ articulation (no tongue), holding the first note with about half of your air. Slur down chromatically and match the timbre and volume of the previous note, breath and repeat. As you descend, the ‘ha’ becomes increasingly difficult. Eg.|: G F# :|: F# F :| etc.

Paul Nedzela - Starting on low E, descend in fifths ie E A, F Bb, F# B, etc. Tongue both notes lightly, playing through all dynamics. For bari, focus on a loose embouchure, clean articulations and keep the mouthpiece at a right angle to the airstream.

I know there are variations on these exercises. Which have you encountered before?
 

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Thanks for this amazing and educational post---one of the best I have read on SOTW. I especially like the link to Ray Smith's You Tube page that I have copied in this post where he teaches a "masterclass" on so many jazz related topics and skills. Ray Smith
 

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You'd love his book then! He was offered the job at UNT but turned it down, and then they hired Alan Baylock. Ray knows his stuff, especially big band directing which I find to be his biggest strength.

When I studied with Chad LB, he taught me one that was passed on to him from Ralph Lalama. I'll have to post about that sometime.
 

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Over the years, being one that approaches every guest artist for lessons, I've been able to take some lessons with some great players over the years. I created a pdf with three low note exercises that I compiled based on their effectiveness as developing evenness, creating warmth and teaching control. They are from Ray Smith, Lew Tabackin and Paul Nedzela. The full article and pdf is here and a summary down below. Video here.

Ray Smith - Beginning at low G, start with a clean ‘du’ articulation and firm air support, moving the jaw forward slightly as you descend. Play with full tone and even dynamics. First with minor thirds, then major thirds all the way to major sixth ie G E Gb Eb F D etc.

Lew Tabackin - Begin with a ‘ha’ articulation (no tongue), holding the first note with about half of your air. Slur down chromatically and match the timbre and volume of the previous note, breath and repeat. As you descend, the ‘ha’ becomes increasingly difficult. Eg.|: G F# :|: F# F :| etc.

Paul Nedzela - Starting on low E, descend in fifths ie E A, F Bb, F# B, etc. Tongue both notes lightly, playing through all dynamics. For bari, focus on a loose embouchure, clean articulations and keep the mouthpiece at a right angle to the airstream.

I know there are variations on these exercises. Which have you encountered before?
Saxspy - Thanks loads for publishing these lessons and exercises. As someone who views himself as being primarily a baritone player (although I play all four), I found Paul Nedzela's exercise and comments particularly interesting and useful, although I will be working on all of them.

Paul is a fantastic baritone player and a worthy successor to Joe Temperley in the JLCO. Did he pass along any other wisdom in your lesson? I recall hearing that Temperley held the Eb key open when he played. Does Nedzela also do this and if so, what does he feel the benefits are?
 

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When I was in college, we only had about five minutes to warm up before the rehearsal started, and I inadvertantly created a quick warm-up routine I use to this day. It takes only a few minutes and works well for low and high ranges of the horn. First, start on Middle C and play a C scale down to low C, and hold as long as possible while focusing on maintaining a good open sound. Next Middle B down to low B, repeat for Bb and A (if applicable). Following that, start again on Middle C and go up to to High C, and hold the high C,a gain focusing on tone quality. DO the same for C#, D Eb, E, and F.

In under five minutes, you've warmed up the entire range of the instrument, opened your face/jaw/throat up, and done a little work on improving your tone.
 
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