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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having problems with the octave G and G#. Everything else is great. This is a new horn, I don't think I had this problem before. I really have to work on the embouchure to get the sound just right.

Any ideas?

Thanks
 

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+1 on this.
 

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could be a leak somewhere, most likely it's a problem with your octave mechanism seeing as it only happens on G2/ G#2 .

I would first check your octave mech to ensure that when you play your G with the octave key pressed, the body octave key is open and the octave key on the crook is fully closed and the pad is sealing on the octave pip. ( it should be the reverse when you play an A e.g. body pip closed and crook key open)

check also that you have some clearance between the loop on the crook key and the arm that operates it .

seeing as we're in the beginners section of the forum, it could be that its your embouchure/mouthpiece or reed causing this .
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I just picked it up from the shop. It did have several leaks and had other adjustments done, which I thought would take care. I checked for the leaks there are none. I do have another cheap tenor, its an easy fix with the embouchure on that one.
 

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Try experimenting with the shape of your aural cavity and embouchure, when I get really tired after a long practice session I sometimes play 2G/G# flat or with the wrong shape which causes the notes to growl, after a 10 minute break all is well again. Start practicing the attached overtones, it will train and strenghten your vocal tract and chops.
 

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Yes, this is all in how you're voicing the notes along with air support and possibly too much pressure on the reed (biting). I have the same horn you do (66R) and had this same problem for quite a while. I fixed it by making sure I was pushing air from my belly and working on loosening up the jaw and voicing techniques. I really think the Mauriat horns for some reason exacerbate this G2 G#2 problem... not sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I agree with you buddy lee about the Mauriat horns. Air support is not an issue, I just have to put more pressure on the reed to sound good. My cheap horn is such a minor adjustment that I don't even notice it.
 

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When I tried a new Mauriat I had the same problem of the note breaking up...G & G#....would be interesting to have serious answers to this...one Series III that I tried had the same problem, but not the one I use all the time, or any other of the many horns I have played over the years. It's presumably something simple?
 

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When I tried a new Mauriat I had the same problem of the note breaking up...G & G#....would be interesting to have serious answers to this...one Series III that I tried had the same problem, but not the one I use all the time, or any other of the many horns I have played over the years. It's presumably something simple?
No clue, this would be something for an acoustical engineer to tackle ;) HOWEVER with a lot of focused work on my part I've gotten to the point where I can play G2/G#2 without the splitting issues. Maybe the Mauriats are just less "forgiving" on these two notes?
 

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No clue, this would be something for an acoustical engineer to tackle ;) HOWEVER with a lot of focused work on my part I've gotten to the point where I can play G2/G#2 without the splitting issues. Maybe the Mauriats are just less "forgiving" on these two notes?
I have had the G2/G#2 problem from time to time with different sax makes. So I think that the cause in most cases is the players tone production technique. At least as the main cause. What happens I think is that the G/G# an octave lower, G1/G#1, is "half way" sounding? And sometimes saxophonists instead of the growling G2/G#2 even get the D/D# a fifth above. I suppose that these sounding notes actually are the second overtone partials of the G1/G#1.

For me the solution has been to take a bit more mouthpiece in my mouth, and loosen the embouchure pressure on the reed. I have managed to localize where on the reed to hold my lower lip in order to actually get the bad G2/G#2, and then put my mouthpiece into my mouth just enough to release the spot on the reed where the growling appears. I also think that it helps to hold my tongue a bit higher, and try to voice the G2/G#2 a bit up, since I believe that I tend to let the G1/G#1 sound.

As a matter of fact you can deliberately play the whole 2nd octave with the octave key pressed, and voice these notes an octave lower. I believe that it is something like that that takes place, though unwanted, when you get the growling G2/G#2.

By voicing I mean to adjust your throat and larynx, and maybe also the tongue when needed, to support the sounding of a specific note. It's is fully comparable with what you do in this respect when you sing some note. Sing at least on octave of a scale and feel with your hand what is happening in your throat.
 
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