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Distinguished SOTW Member
TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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Procured one of these back then for a friend's son who was starting band. He didn't stick with it so the horn just sat around in their house for 20 years. I got it back and was going through it to sell and discovered the body tube was bent forward a little. I didn't hesitate - turned around with it and whacked a table with a cushioned top with the receiver until the rods looked straight again. Checking the bore, it was straight again. It actually was not bad enough to affect any pad sealing rings.
Looking down the bore, what are you looking for? You move your viewpoint or the horn so that you can eye the inner walls all the way around, always focusing on the joint between the lower body and the bell, lining it up with the inner edge of the clamp collar. If its bent (usually forward but not always) the bend will show as a bulge in the bore which blocks your view of the lower joint ring. On the opposite side from the 'bulge', you will be able to easily line up the inner edge of the clamp collar with the lower ring. When the bend is corrected, you still may encounter an 'occlusion' of the lower bend but it will be even all around. This is because the bore taper is not really straight - it is very slightly curved, especially at the top.
Anyway, looking for the bulge is why you look down the bore. Fortunately this horn was still clean, like new, so there was no gunk in it interfering with the viewing. If it had been, I may have had to clean the bore before being able to analyze it to be certain of the direction in which to apply the force.
But like others have said, never let a 'civilian' see you correcting a bore like this!
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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... When the bend is corrected, you still may encounter an 'occlusion' of the lower bend but it will be even all around. This is because the bore taper is not really straight - it is very slightly curved, especially at the top....
Interesting.
Do you know whether this is by acoustic design on a good sax, or an anomaly of the production process?
If the former, can you throw any light on what it does?

AFAIK the bore of a modern flute (apart from the head) is truly cylindrical, but there can be deviations in cylindricality for a clarinet, so perhaps there may be comparable deviations in conicality for a sax. What about an oboe?)
 
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