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Alto, C-mel, Saxie
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I stumbled across this the other day and thought fellow C-melody/Rudy Wiedoeft enthusiasts might find it interesting. It's an incredibly bizarre 1931 short about a father who hates his son's saxophone, tries to get rid of it, and suddenly Rudy Wiedoeft appears wearing a clown suit, and -- well, this isn't the sort of film you watch for the plot, anyway.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5RLzT1y4nBQ

It's awesome to actually get to see Rudy play "Sax-O-Phun" and "Saxophobia" -- particularly the latter. The video quality isn't very good, but it's good enough to see how insanely fast his fingers are moving.
 

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Cool video. I wonder what was the first music video(film) ever. Then what was first with sound.
 

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Noticed he's playing a left side keyed model, probably the Holton signature models? And the tenors and bari have opposing keys, but the alto looks like a left hand keys model too. Thanks for posting.
 

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I found the clown clown costumes interesting. Think that they were going for a "Six Brown Brothers" look?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I found the clown clown costumes interesting. Think that they were going for a "Six Brown Brothers" look?
That's the impression I got, too. I'd never heard of Rudy performing in a clown costume prior to this, so it's possible that it could have been a reference to the Browns.
 

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Noticed he's playing a left side keyed model, probably the Holton signature models? And the tenors and bari have opposing keys, but the alto looks like a left hand keys model too. Thanks for posting.
It's a Selmer C melody. Rudy Wiedoeft endorsed almost every brand of saxophone at one time or another, but he always played a Selmer.
 

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It's a Selmer C melody. Rudy Wiedoeft endorsed almost every brand of saxophone at one time or another, but he always played a Selmer.
It is my understanding the majority of his recordings were all done on a Selmer melody C. Also he endorsed Horton but never recorded on one. Is this true? Member LaPorta a.k.a. Felix and Soybean have put a ton into the Holton section threads. If you have anything to add please do.
 

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It still amazes me that this movie reflects the best of entertainment and tech of its day. Early sound effects like the clock ticking in the bedroom scene. The special effects and the costumes likeness to the Brown brothers. I could just imagine what it was like hanging out one of those tone holes. All trying to balance yourself in a chair or something while playing 300 takes on a smoldering non-air-conditioned set. What did that pay? $5.00 a week?
 

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It's videos like these that leave me wondering if I gave up the drugs too soon or too late.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
It still amazes me that this movie reflects the best of entertainment and tech of its day. Early sound effects like the clock ticking in the bedroom scene. The special effects and the costumes likeness to the Brown brothers. I could just imagine what it was like hanging out one of those tone holes. All trying to balance yourself in a chair or something while playing 300 takes on a smoldering non-air-conditioned set. What did that pay? $5.00 a week?
The sound aspect is even more amazing when you consider this was only four years after The Jazz Singer. The film industry had to literally reinvent itself in order to accommodate the use of sound; that they came this far in just four short years is incredible. It's also great that they were able to capture what was arguably the swan song of the 1920s sax craze. The Great Depression had hit, people couldn't afford saxophones anymore, and Rudy Wiedoeft would be in the where-are-they-now file not long after; this film was made with better times in mind, and I think it conveys the spirit of those times pretty well. ...Plus it's just really entertaining to watch. :)
 

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The Great Depression had hit, people couldn't afford saxophones anymore,
In the 1930's the average annual income was about $1,970, and the average cost for house rent was about $18.00 per month.
Best I can tell in 1930 a Rudy Wiedoeft alto was $130 plus $14 for the premium case. $144 was equal to 8 months rent or 7.3% of a years wages.
It鈥檚 quite something these old films. A time capsule of entertainment.
 

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It seems like they had a lot of funny ideas but didn't know where to go with it so they threw everything into the pot and made a hash of it. Speaking of bizarre short films, check out the cartoon version of St. James Infirmary Blues with Betty Boop. Music by Cab Calloway with a Betty Boop cartoon playing out the lyrics. Just a bizarre little film. https://www.bing.com/videos/search?...035E72F46B9872E84B68035E72F46B9872E&FORM=VIRE
 

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Speaking of bizarre short films, check out the cartoon version of St. James Infirmary Blues with Betty Boop. Music by Cab Calloway with a Betty Boop cartoon playing out the lyrics. Just a bizarre little film.
What kind of drugs were those people on? That was made in 1933...everything was legal. Yikes!
 

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It's videos like these that leave me wondering if I gave up the drugs too soon or too late.
I was wondering the same thing too....And I even played a C Melody (along with other instruments) in bands back in the 60's and late 70's...Maybe I quit C Melody when I quit doing drugs.....the time line fits....
 

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Have had "Sax-O-Phun" stuck in my head the past few days now because of this - very interesting and cool to see Wiedoeft playing but very weird film...
 
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