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Discussion Starter #1
My question is about the octave riser valve on this sax that I'm restoring. When I look inside the neck there is a 3/16" tube hanging down a half inch into the neck under the octave riser pippet. None of my other 3 saxophones has this tube - they are all smooth bore under the pippet. This King Tempo has new pads and is difficult to play in that sometimes a note simply will not play - as if the reed stops. It's a random problem and happens on all keys.

Should I unsolder the pippet and cut the tube down to 1/16 inch and re-solder ?
 

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Forum Contributor 2007-2012, Distinguished SOTW Te
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If this is original, its just a difference in design. Some pips extend in to the bore some don't.

A half inch sounds a bit long. Wouldn't that be about the diameter of the neck? Pictures?

Have you checked the neck tenon for leaks?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Neck tenon is tight - no leak or slippage. Trying to take pictures now .......

Nope - can't get light into neck and still focus camera into it. But I was apparently exaggerating about the length of the tube. It looks closer to 1/4 inch.

It may be the new pads haven't totally seated yet. I'll try some neatsfoot oil to soften the leather and that should help.
 

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No! Good pads seated well do not need any sort of treatment.

I would advise having a friend who repairs horns double check your work. Or just turn off the lights and go over it with a fine toothed comb. Any leak is a bad leak! Sounds like a leak somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I checked the serial number and it dates to '17. One article on the net said that the Tempo models at that time were all imported from Kielwerth by King.
 

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Your horn is a Keilwerth, so use a Keilwerth serial chart.

Get on saxpics.com for lots of good info. What you have is called a "stencil", where one company makes it and another puts their name on it.
 

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^^Indeed, and the serial numbers of stencils very rarely correspond to those of either the name on the bell, or in many instances even the manufacturer. In this case, the serial numbers absolutely do not correspond to those of King.

If it was indeed from 1917, it would have split bell keys. This is what a King alto from that period would look like:

http://www.hnwhite.com/King/Saxophone%20page/1919%20Alto%20Saxophone%20Large.jpg
 

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Since this thread is blessed with technical expertise, perhaps I could digress slightly and ask: the point of the pip extending into the body tube is to prevent it from being plugged by condensation - right or wrong?
 

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Sorta- the length isn't going to make a whole lot of difference for that problem unless the pip is on the bottom, like a 6M. The length of the pip also influences intonation (as does the diameter and location). Probably if the length was the result of a thought-out decision (which hopefully it would be) intonation and response would be the major factors.
 

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BTW...King Tempos are good players....quite good. Those JK stencil horns form the '60's-'70's are some of my favorites....
 
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