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I recently decided to get back into playing sax, after taking an almost 30 year break from playing in school and college. Earlier today, I bought a mint condition Yamaha YAS-23 that I found on Facebook Marketplace. The lady said her son used it for 1 single day back in junior high school, and it's been sitting in a closet for the last 17 years. Judging by the appearance (not a single scratch), she was telling the truth. To my untrained eye, the pads look great and the keys have good bounce. The corks look good as well. I really can't judge the sound too much, because I'm quite a bit out of practice and sound like an angry cat. I don't hear any air leaks though. It's serial number 331xxx, with an A a few spaces after the serial number. Not sure if that means America, or Alto. The bell is inscribed Yamaha Established in 1887 Japan.

Anyway, should I take it in to my local instrument shop for a going over? It looks fresh from the factory so perhaps I'd be wasting my money, but I'm not sure if sitting in a closet for 17 years affected it much. Thoughts?
 

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If it plays then no worries. If you're not sure - a trip to the shop is always a good plan. A reputable repairperson will let you know what it needs. I once found a 1940's Conn that played incredible on original pads. It was stored in a dry place and really didn't need anything. Good Luck
 

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The pads may be dried out but it may be fine. Take it to a shop you trust and have it checked out because it will almost certainly need some slight adjustments. If it's as pristine as she says it may be in like new condition. Good luck.
 

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Everything considered, it probably needs no more than a few shop adjustments. I wouldn't consider it a "waste of money" getting back into it knowing your equipment is in good working order.

A pads' natural state is dry. They only 'dry out' after they are continually wetted with condensation and saliva, repeatedly over time. One day of play from a sixth grader isn't going to do anything. I've been doing hobby work for long enough that I have loose pads in my stock that are nearly as old as 17 years, and they are perfectly good, usable pads.
 

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I recently decided to get back into playing sax, after taking an almost 30 year break from playing in school and college. Earlier today, I bought a mint condition Yamaha YAS-23 that I found on Facebook Marketplace. The lady said her son used it for 1 single day back in junior high school, and it's been sitting in a closet for the last 17 years. Judging by the appearance (not a single scratch), she was telling the truth. To my untrained eye, the pads look great and the keys have good bounce. The corks look good as well. I really can't judge the sound too much, because I'm quite a bit out of practice and sound like an angry cat. I don't hear any air leaks though. It's serial number 331xxx, with an A a few spaces after the serial number. Not sure if that means America, or Alto. The bell is inscribed Yamaha Established in 1887 Japan.

Anyway, should I take it in to my local instrument shop for a going over? It looks fresh from the factory so perhaps I'd be wasting my money, but I'm not sure if sitting in a closet for 17 years affected it much. Thoughts?
Welcome to SOTW:)

That long property stored on orginal pads most likely will only need minor attention. Pads may have settled some...it’s been awhile.
Oiling would be my concern. After 17 years things could get a tad sticky. Congratulations on a great find and jumping back into playing.

A call or email with SN# to Yamaha may yield the dealer and year shipped to dealership.
Yamahas are difficult to extract exact dating. You’re on the right track with bell stamping.

https://usa.yamaha.com/support/parts_manuals/index.html

All things Yamaha. Enjoy !
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/forumdisplay.php?114-Yamaha
 

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Everything considered, it probably needs no more than a few shop adjustments. I wouldn't consider it a "waste of money" getting back into it knowing your equipment is in good working order.

A pads' natural state is dry. They only 'dry out' after they are continually wetted with condensation and saliva, repeatedly over time. One day of play from a sixth grader isn't going to do anything. I've been doing hobby work for long enough that I have loose pads in my stock that are nearly as old as 17 years, and they are perfectly good, usable pads.
Thanks for the correction. I assumed, not being a tech, that leather would dry out like an old pair of shoes or an old pair of leather gloves. I do know the pads on my tenor that had done about 10 years ago are still in like-new condition.
 

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I'm wondering how well the key oil held up after that many years of sitting around. Quick fix for a tech, if it was in a temperature controlled environment. Not a bad buy at all though. I'm very partial to these altos, and play professionally on an older YAS-21 Vito stencil. They are fantastic horns!
 

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Considering most saxes need adjustment soon after leaving the factory, and that it has been sitting around for so long, I reckon it almost certainly has a plethora of small leaks that need to be adjusted out.
 

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Get it checked out. Most techs still give free estimates, so it should cost nothing to find out whats up. Could be perfect, may need a bunch of work. Like Gordon said, most new horns don't play well from the factory, and just sitting there doesn't make them better. You have no idea under what conditions it has been stored. Just because someone says that it has only been played one day, means nothing. try giving it a blow with a soft reed and see how it goes, or get someone else that plays regularly to do so for you.
 

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Shouldn’t need anything more than a leak check and oiling. Any tech can do both in about 15 minutes.
 

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It is about 1 in 50 saxes that I see that only needs oiling.
Most need quite a range of small adjustments at least, in order to eliminate significant leaks.
But that is what a good technician does fast and well.
 
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