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Forum Contributor 2016-17
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171 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m overhauling my Conn 10m and the pivot screw in the low C# post is stuck. Looks like someone before me mangled the head a bit. I’m going to use penetrating oil etc. but I’m having trouble determining if there is a set/grub screw in the middle of the ‘+’ on the post, since that area is a bit mangled also. Can someone who owns a 10M with a similar post let me know if there is a set screw in there? I know I could just leave the pivot screw but I’d like to try to get it out.
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Thanks.
 

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Forum Contributor 2016-17
Joined
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171 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Where you going to get a new post from?

MAYBE you can find someone with a junker that a post can come from. Keep in mind it's got to have the correct height and not be one of those with an odd angle to the foot. It would be good if it had the right thread, but my 6M has had a standard post with standard pivot screw in that location since I've owned it (43 years and counting).

Or, you could have one machined up for you. At any rate, you'll need to make good measurements whichever way you end up going.
Thanks turf3, I agree I may not be able to find a proper replacement so easily. At this point the key is functional, I’ll likely start my search for a replacement post, finish the overhaul, and if need be I can play it as-is until I get the new post.
 

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Forum Contributor 2016-17
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171 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
On a hunch I decided to measure the post on my 10M and check the same post on an old Conn parts horn I have in the shop. The parts horn was one that somebody spray painted and used as a wall decoration before selling it "as is" on Ebay. It turned out that the post was a very close match, including a set screw. It cleaned up quite nice including the spring. Send me a pm with your address and I will send it to you at no charge.


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Wow, that is extremely generous, thank you so much! Sending you the PM now.
 

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Forum Contributor 2016-17
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171 Posts
Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Maybe I missed it but I don't think it was mentioned what this actually is? This is an unfortunate old method of trying to remove screws with damaged slots. Even more unfortunate that it's probably still used now, though at least not as much. Basically someone uses some kind of saw to cut a slot in the screw, and cuts the post along with it. It's not that common, but you see this occasionally both for Conn set screws and for pivot and rod screws on any model sax.

There are two problems with it. First, it damages the post, and second, if the slot is ruined it usually means the screw is stuck, so there is even more chance of them repeating this, ruining it even more, etc.
In this case it probably didn't work in one direction so they tried another. Not that I would ever suggest this method, but in this case it looks like whatever they used to cut was too thick anyway and would never work, damage to the post or not.

Sounds like the problem is solved and the post will be replaced, but FWIW, with the ability and the right tools, it is actually possible to cut a new slot in a screw buried in a post with a damaged slot, without damage to the post. It works in most cases, in fact it nearly always does. It is extremely rare that I have to resort to alum or anything like that, which is what I do too when nothing else works. It is not really possible to do with a regular dremel, not enough precision and control (it wouldn't be surprising if that X was done with a dremel).
Of course that doesn't solve the (most likely cosmetic) issue of the X there, but that is a separate problem and depends on time, budget, availability, etc.
Yes, whatever was used to cut the +, it was much thicker than e.g. a jeweler's saw. The appearance of the + in relation to the surrounding material also makes it look like it was done quite some time ago, but that is just speculation on my part.

For future reference, what tool would you use to cut a new slot in a buried screw?
 
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