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Discussion Starter #1
Every time I have played a well-set-up Buescher True Tone I have been well impressed with the ease of blowing, accurate overtones, etc. I have never A/B'd against a Conn M which is what I play (except for soprano, where I'm coming to grips with a True Tone, and bass).

Has anyone here gone full Buescher True Tone for jazz (soprano, alto, tenor, baritone)? And what are your impressions of each size for jazz usage?

For reference I use middle of the road MPs (prefer Meyer on ATB and Selmer on S).

Just thinking about making a change after 40 years of playing Conn 6M 10M and 12M. Probably not serious about it, but I would like to hear from All-True-Tone players. (If any exist, outside of the Rascher disciples.)
 

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I use my TT alto for jazz, rock, blues, funk, you name it. I use my TT soprano for jazz, pop and also with my New Orleans style brass band. As Saxtroll used to say, it's the injun, not the arrow.
 

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Point taken, but it’s probably about time to retire that particular expression, no?
 

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...
 

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Point taken, but it’s probably about time to retire that particular expression, no?
“It’s the archer, not the arrow”

“It’s the mechanic, not the wrench”???

“It’s the craftsperson, not the tool”???
 

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I've been blowing thru a 1926 Series II TT soprano for the last 40 years. People often say nice things about the tone.

It's the horn, not the player.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well, it depends on the player how much the instrument matters to them.

I think it's a bit disingenuous to claim that all saxophones behave the same to all players and that the instrument makes no difference. For example, the fact is that for me (YMMV) the ease of accessing the overtone series varies a great deal among instruments from different makers; and the intonation of those overtones varies a great deal, too. My Conn 6M I can play all the notes clear up to high D or Eb, well in tune; my Martin Handcraft Committee alto I can't access most of these and the intonation is sketchy. When I trialed a Buescher bass sax, within a couple minutes I was playing clear up to high C or so, beautifully in tune; my Noblet bass (which I chose for other reasons) it's hard to even eke out a high G, and the tuning is really off.

Similarly, I did an A/B comparison of the Conn alto and Martin alto in a medium size, rather loud band, on the lead alto seat; I had to blow a LOT harder to hear and be heard on the Martin, using exact same MP and reed, switching back and forth minute by minute.

So at least for me there are very significant differences in saxophones.
 

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I think it's a bit disingenuous to claim that all saxophones behave the same to all players and that the instrument makes no difference.
Well, to me... Bueschers are quality saxophones that I can use for any style of music. Never would I say the instrument makes no difference in a quality sense. But so long as a horn suits me, I can use it to play any style of music.
 

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Well, to me... Bueschers are quality saxophones that I can use for any style of music. Never would I say the instrument makes no difference in a quality sense. But so long as a horn suits me, I can use it to play any style of music.
+1

I play a 1928/1929 TT bari in jazz and rock. It isn't as responsive as a Yamaha or Selmer, but it isn't nearly as boring to play as them either. A lot of audience members tell me between sets and after shows that they really enjoy it too.

The TT alto I got to play was a similar story. I prefer modern altos, and the LH pinky table has its disadvantages, but if you handed me one I would have no complaints using that horn in any genre.
 

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Well, to me... Bueschers are quality saxophones that I can use for any style of music. Never would I say the instrument makes no difference in a quality sense. But so long as a horn suits me, I can use it to play any style of music.
My attitude as well. Someone asked me awhile back why I play on them. I ended up quoting Kenneth Coon (bari with the Rascher Quartet) saying they just work best for me. There are plenty other good horns out there that might work better for someone else.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
My attitude as well. Someone asked me awhile back why I play on them. I ended up quoting Kenneth Coon (bari with the Rascher Quartet) saying they just work best for me. There are plenty other good horns out there that might work better for someone else.
I read an interesting thing last night in the context of harpsichord design (there have been a lot of variants over the centuries). Roughly paraphrasing, it goes something like "you may actually want to avoid an instrument with a "too gorgeous" sound in favor of one with a more neutral sound. All that gorgeousness can get a bit wearing, and everything you play ends up sounding like your instrument rather than Bach or Scarlatti or Dowland or whoever".

I don't know if this is relevant to the discussion, but somehow it feels like it might be. I do know that we see a lot of posts from people who are playing mouthpieces with very distinctive characteristics, in order to use those specific characteristics, and fewer but still a significant number of people who play rather ordinary middle of the road setups and feel that doing so doesn't impose a particular sound on them.

Does any of that make sense?
 

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Roughly paraphrasing, it goes something like "you may actually want to avoid an instrument with a "too gorgeous" sound in favor of one with a more neutral sound.

I don't know if this is relevant to the discussion, but somehow it feels like it might be. I do know that we see a lot of posts from people who are playing mouthpieces with very distinctive characteristics, in order to use those specific characteristics, and fewer but still a significant number of people who play rather ordinary middle of the road setups and feel that doing so doesn't impose a particular sound on them.

Does any of that make sense?
Yes, I think it does make sense. I never really thought of it like this, but I think it may explain why I tend to go back to my VI tenor after playing the Buescher 'Crat tenor for a while. The Buescher has a gorgeous sound and maybe, just maybe, I get kind of tired of it. But I'm not going to get bogged down worrying about why I prefer one horn over the other at any given period of time.
 

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Many people round here absolutely deny that the weight, materials, ribbed /non ribbed construction and resonance of the instrument is a factor on the core sound. My 2 vintage horns are miles apart. The Truetone just intrinsically sounds more like a traditional saxophone than my 10M. Its not a better instrument but it has a simplicity that gives it advantages in many areas especially trad, dixieland, "whatever the label is this week"
 

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Many people round here absolutely deny that the weight, materials, ribbed /non ribbed construction and resonance of the instrument is a factor on the core sound. My 2 vintage horns are miles apart. The Truetone just intrinsically sounds more like a traditional saxophone than my 10M. Its not a better instrument but it has a simplicity that gives it advantages in many areas especially trad, dixieland, "whatever the label is this week"
Mass, materials, ribs, etc. aside, the GEOMETRY of the design dominates the sound of a saxophone.
 

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For years, I played mostly TT straight sopranos and a TT alto in trad jazz bands. It was "the look", don'tcha' know.

As time went on and I acquired different instruments, I moved away from the TT's and now I play mostly a VI soprano (and a Conn NWII straight), and a Big B alto (although I have other altos I like equally as well).

The sopranos I play now seem to have slightly better intonation than the TT's I once owned, my Mark VI being the best for intonation among all sopranos I've owned and played.

My Big B alto is much easier to play than my TT alto, and I can say the same for the other altos I still have in my closet - all easier than my TT. But that doesn't mean much in view of the total universe of any of these brands and models. I'm suppose that somewhere out there are sets of sopranos and altos of different makes and models that are equal to, or better than, the ones I play now - or played years ago.

Tone? Last year I stood next to an older gentleman (look who's talking here) in a jazz band who played a Yamaha Custom Z alto - he sounded just like Rudy Weidoeft. It ain't the horn . . . DAVE
 
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